Women in Other Countries are Turning to Trades 

Women in Other Countries are Turning to Trades

Image: REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

Image: REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

Many women in India have an education but are competing against a privileged group, so they end up having an education put have to take jobs such as housekeeping where wages are meager, and it is not enough money to support their families. These low scale jobs bring them at the bottom of the social ladder. Everyone dreams of getting an education and being able to climb the ladder, but that is not the case for all. I feel like that is a very similar situation in America. Not just women, but men too. There is also a lot of competition when if comes to jobs learning a trade is in demand, and if you continue to pursue your education, you can land positions as a foreman, superintendent, project manager, and Certified Welding Inspector. You can do a lot of self-education to climb the ladder, with experience and learning to read blueprints, learning codes. You can also open up a fabrication shop, do jobs on the side while you work and build your business. Learning sanitation welding could put you in higher demand. Sanitation welders are used in breweries, food processing plant, pharmaceutical plants, dairy plants, that just to name a few.  

I recently met a woman who had been in construction as a single mother. Later she started a welding cap business and was able to gain a large following on Instagram because of her construction background. Today she is building an empire called DUGZS Welding Caps

I believe learning a trade makes a person resourceful. As more and more people share their stories with me, I am finding they are not just welders they are Jack and Jills of many trades. They learn on skill and usually pick up experience in other trades. Laela, with DUGZ Welding Caps, is learning to weld now and plans to monetize off of it someday. 

Read more about India putting trades on the map to help solve the unemployment and trades gap HERE

These women take on domestic work for the lack of any other skill that they can monetize. That’s why I believe the answer lies in vocational training. These women need to learn survival skills – understanding and processing information, making informed choices, managing finances, handling crisis situations – along with vocational skills such as sewing, driving, plumbing, welding and cooking, all of which are in demand.

Recently, one of my clients in the manufacturing sector told me: “It’s easy to find engineers, you get them a dime a dozen. But try finding me a good welder!” Another acquaintance in the construction industry is struggling to find good electricians and plumbers, for example.

Traditionally, these haven’t been the roles for women, but aren’t paradigms changing? If quality plumbers or electricians are so hard to find, why can’t we train women in these skills and plug the supply-demand gap?
— https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/05/how-female-welders-plumbers-and-electricians-could-save-india-s-urban-poor/